Final Fantasy XV

Dec 17

Dec 17

The Music Stylings of Papo & Yo, Soundtrack and Sale on PSN Tomorrow

Deborah Chantson's Avatar Posted by Community Manager, Minority Media

Just as I wrote about graffiti in Papo & Yo back in July, I wanted to share another story and video diary about how we captured the unique music and sound to transport players deeper into the South American favela of Quico’s imagination. And with the flood of requests we’ve gotten since launch, I’m excited to announce that the Papo & Yo soundtrack will be available for purchase starting tomorrow on PSN in North America! As a special release day promotion, it will be on sale for 15% off the regular price (30% off for Plus members) until January 4th.

Over the past few months, some of you may have caught my tweets about our brilliant composer and sound designer, Brian D’Oliveira from La Hacienda Creative. Fun facts like “Brian D’Oliveira learned about 15 new instruments to play for Papo & Yo!” or “when Monster runs, the sound effect actually comes from hitting a fridge,” are just a glimpse of the music’s backstory in Papo & Yo.

Many people won’t realize that the soundtrack of Papo & Yo is actually dynamic and interactive, triggered by actions such as Quico moving, standing still, and pulling levers, and Monster getting angry. In some levels, there are up to 30-40 layers of music and 60-70 layers of sound effects, all blended together. When Quico pulls the first lever to build the stacking snake ladder in the puzzle we call “Bend Them to Your Will” (seen in the picture below), players trigger the drums and the music builds as each house is added on.

Papo & Yo for PS3 (PSN)

Bend them to your will, Papo & Yo

As you saw in the video diary above, the majority of the sounds in Papo & Yo are as authentic as can be, since Brian actually traveled to the Amazonian rainforest to record ambient noise in the field. Venturing out in the middle of the night, he was able to capture wildlife sounds like monkeys howling, frogs croaking, and birds chirping. Hiking through the land, Brian recorded waterfalls, scurrying ants, and whatever else he thought he could use, layering it into an immersive soundscape players can get lost in.

Papo & Yo for PS3 (PSN)

Brian D’Oliveira, capturing ambiance

For Foley (the sound effects track in the game), Brian and his team at La Hacienda had to think “outside of the box” to avoid using pre-mixed sounds that wouldn’t do the story justice. They had exploratory sessions where they would just improvise and see what sounds could be made, or captured on the fly, like recording the noise of a demolition site down the street. Driven by a deep love for the project, Brian and his team went the distance, importing roof shingles from Texas, buying rare instruments, and even building makeshift instruments to create the right sounds. Here is a great example in the video below.

For the music in Papo & Yo, Brian used a fusion of rhythm, melodies, and sounds from South American countries like Brazil, Colombia, and Venezuela, but also drew influences from India, Africa, and even early European Baroque music. It’s really evident in the variety of instruments he used –- from a rare, 100-year-old Sarangi, to an African Kora and Brazilian hunting whistles, all paired alongside traditional instruments like guitars, flutes, violin, and cello.

Papo & Yo for PS3 (PSN)

Preparation for recording Foley

Brian plays approximately 80% of the instruments you hear in the game, but he also collaborated with great musicians like Orlando ‘VoVo’ Conceinçao on percussion (pictured below), Loga Ramin Torkian on Bowed Guitar Viol & Kamaan, Kamal Sabri on Lead Sarangi and Elinor Frey on Baroque Cello.

Papo & Yo for PS3 (PSN)

Orlando ‘VoVo’ Conceinçao on percussion

All of the music in Papo & Yo was recorded live, track by track, because Brian “wanted the music to be honest and fragile, with all of the beautiful imperfections that come with live playing.” With a troubled childhood and an absentee father of his own, Brian says he identified with the story of Papo & Yo, and it pushed him to grow both personally and musically as the game developed. In his words: “I feel like I composed the soundtrack to my life.”

Papo & Yo for PS3 (PSN)

Brian playing an African kora

If you have questions for Brian or Minority, please write them in the comments below or Tweet them to @we_are_minority and @La_Hacienda, and we’ll be glad to answer them. Don’t forget that the soundtrack goes on sale tomorrow — get yours ASAP! If you haven’t had a chance to play Papo yet, the game itself will also be on sale from December 24th to 30th in North America as part of this year’s PlayStation Essentials promotion, so keep an eye out over the holidays!

Soundtrack and PlayStation Essentials details

From December 18 to January 4th in North America, the Papo & Yo Original Soundtrack will be on sale for 15% off the regular price. If you’re a PS Plus member, you’ll save 30% off the regular price! And in North America from December 24 to December 30, Papo & Yo will be part of PlayStation Essentials. Save 30% off the regular price, or if you’re a PS Plus member, you can save 50%. Papo & Yo also makes a great gift – no wrapping required!

Add Your Own

Midgetguy said:

December 17th, 1:30 pm

Awesome awesome awesome!!!!

The music was among my favorite aspects of this game!

I would sometimes keep the game playing in the background so I could hear the music, and now I won’t have to do that anymore!

I can’t wait!

Thank you so much for making the soundtrack available as a download! ^_^

The music, and the game as a whole, are so beautiful! They simply must be shared!

cabellos said:

December 17th, 2:16 pm

Great!! Can’t wait to buy it! (and the game)

We_Are_Minority said:

December 17th, 2:40 pm

Thanks so much Midgetguy and cabellos! We really appreciate your enthusiasm and support!

GhostMachine1 said:

December 17th, 2:53 pm

I preordered because I knew the game would be great.

We_Are_Minority said:

December 17th, 3:32 pm

GhostMachine1, we thank you for that and hope it met your expectations.

FORMIK said:

December 17th, 9:40 pm

This is such a good game, and the music is part of why it is so enjoyable.

taurus82 said:

December 18th, 1:31 am

Consider it purchased, when it hits the EU Store, if SCEE doesn’t screw-up that is.
Some avatars would be nice as well.

Logan22 said:

December 18th, 2:48 am

I’ve been waiting so long for this. For me personally, this has been the most moving PSN indie game this year and the soundtrack was more moving than Journey’s, Unfinished Swan, etc. especially as the credits were rolling. I will have that song on loop for a long time.

Its about time this Latin masterpiece got its due. Very nice background here on where it came from and how it came about.

We_Are_Minority said:

December 18th, 7:41 am

What lovely comments! Thank you so much!

mr_krispy_kreme said:

December 18th, 8:06 am

Wow, I knew Minority put a lot of effort into the game design and the game feel, but I had no idea the team went to such a great expense to make the sound so great! I guess I take a lot of the audio feel of the game for granted.

Sounds like another playthrough is warranted ;)

We_Are_Minority said:

December 18th, 8:40 am

Yes please! We shall continue this conversation on Twitter!

Kakoiw said:

January 10th, 3:03 pm

i cant wait to play it! this game is amazing!
the songs are lovely! very conected with fellings!
and the scenario loooks amazing! very brasilian fantasy haha!
the way used the cuica to make the robot sound! haha amazing!!

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